Quality Improvement

Reducing harm

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  Category: Infection prevention & control

Hand hygiene NZ

Hand hygiene NZ

What is Hand Hygiene New Zealand?

Hand Hygiene New Zealand (HHNZ) is a national quality improvement initiative led by Health Quality and Safety Commission (HQSC), aiming to improve hand hygiene practice in New Zealand hospitals. This initiative commenced in early 2012 with quarterly ‘Gold Audits’ performed by trained auditors.  The audit measures how many times staff comply with the World Health Organisation’s 5 moments of hand hygiene.

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Target zero central line associated bacteraemias (CLAB)

Target zero central line associated bacteraemias (CLAB)

What is a central line associated bacteraemia (CLAB)?

A central line associated bacteraemia (CLAB) is an infection of the blood (bacteraemia) associated with a central line.  Central lines are catheters that are inserted in a large vein near the heart and are used to give medications or fluids.  They are frequently used in Intensive Care Units (ICUs).


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Surgical site infections: understanding the problem

Surgical site infections: understanding the problem

What is a surgical site infection?

A surgical site infection (SSI) is an infection that occurs after surgery in the part of the body where the surgery took place

SSIs can be categorised according to the layers of tissue the infection infiltrates.  In some cases the infection may be superficial involving the skin only, while in other cases they can be more serious and can involve tissues under the skin, organs, or implanted material (such as an artificial joint).


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Reducing catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI)

Reducing catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI)

What is a Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI)?

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection involving any part of the urinary system, including the kidneys, urethra, bladder and ureters.  UTIs are the most common type of healthcare associated infection.

Approximately 75% of UTIs acquired in hospital are associated with a urinary catheter, which is a tube inserted into the bladder through the urethra to drain urine.  Between 15-25% of hospitalised patients receive urinary catheters during their hospital stay.  The most important risk factor for developing a catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI) is prolonged use of the urinary catheter.  Therefore, catheters should only be used for appropriate indications and should be removed as soon as they are no longer needed.


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